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CREDITS & BIOGRAPHIES

This section provides biographies of some of the key people involved, and acknowledgements of key sources used in the making of Ceremony - The Djungguwan of Northeast Arnhem Land.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS AND ORIGINAL SOURCES

WRITINGS ON THE DJUNGGUWAN

Origins of the Djungguwan

With permission of Professor Nicolas Peterson and Wanyubi Marika.

The Myth

With permission of Professor Nicolas Peterson and Wanyubi Marika.

Wawilak Narratives (A Text by Ian Dunlop)

With permission of Ian Dunlop.
© Ian Dunlop 2005.

Extracts from Journey to the Crocodile's Nest

With permission of Professor Howard Morphy.
Originally published in Journey to the Crocodile's Nest: An Accompanying Monograph to the Film Madarrpa Funeral at Gurkawuy, Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies, Canberra, 2002. © Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies 1984.

Manikay (Song Cycle) of the Djungguwan 2002

With permission of Wanyubi Marika, Raymattja Marika, Djuwalpi Marika, Lak Lak Yunupingu Marika.


YIRRKALA POLITICAL HISTORY

Originally published in Mabo - The Native Title Revolution CD-Rom, Film Australia, 2000.

A Film Australia National Interest Program in association with Buona Notte Productions and Tantamount Productions. Developed and produced with the assistance of the Multimedia 21 Fund Cinemedia. © Film Australia, Cinemedia 2000.

The Tradition of Bark Painting at Yirrkala

With permission of Tim Rowse, Trevor Graham and Film Australia.

The Yirrkala Bark Petition

With permission of Tim Rowse, Trevor Graham and Film Australia.

Milirrpum v Nabalco Pty Ltd

With permission of Garth Nettheim and Film Australia.

Public Reaction to the Gove Decision

With permission of The Age and Film Australia.


WEBSITE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Djungguwan at Gurka'wuy

With permission of Wukun Wanambi

Translations for Djungguwan - Speaking to the Future

With permission of Wanyubi Marika, Raymattja Marika, Djuwalpi Marika, Lak Lak Yunupingu Marika

The Djunguan of Yirrkala

With permission of The Rirratjingu Association
Courtesy of The Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS)

Paintings

Wawilak 1 & Wawilak 2 by

Wanyubi Marika
With kind permission of Wanyubi Marika

Djarrka Creation Story

Mayawa Creation Story

The Sisters And Their Companions At Their Gundimulk Ground At Gurka'wuy 1976-77

by Dundiwuy Wanambi
With kind permission of Gundimolk Wanambi

Background designs for website with permission of Wukun Wanambi

Photographs

Djungguwan at Gurka'wuy

Courtesy Ian Dunlop

Photographs of 2002 Djungguwan Ceremony by Trevor Graham and Rose Hesp




DVD CREDITS

Ceremony - The Djungguwan of Northeast Arnhem Land DVD

Director: Trevor Graham
Writers: Trevor Graham, Philippa Deveson, Professor Howard Morphy and Ian Dunlop
Yolngu Consultants: Wanyubi Marika and Wukun Dennis Wanambi
Producer: Denise Haslem
Executive Producer: Chris Warner
Duration: 360 minutes
Year: 2006

DVD Design, Production & Authoring Elastic Wit Studio

A Film Australia National Interest Program in association with Denise Haslem Productions Pty Ltd. Made in collaboration with Yirrkala Dhanbul Community Association and the Rirratjingu Association.


For information about Film Australia's programs, contact:

Film Australia
PO Box 46 Lindfield NSW 2070
tel 02 9413 8634
fax 02 9416 9401
email sales@filmaust.com.au
www.filmaust.com.au

© Film Australia Limited 2006.



BIOGRAPHIES / WEBSITE CREDITS

TREVOR GRAHAM

Writer/Director

Trevor Graham has worked as a writer, producer and director of documentary in the Australian film industry for more than 20 years. He is the co-founder of Yarra Bank Films Pty Ltd, a Sydney-based production company established in 1983.

Trevor's documentaries have been screened and broadcast nationally and internationally.
He has made co-productions and commissioned works for Channel 4 and the BBC (Britain), WGBH (America), ARTE (France/Germany), AVRO (Netherlands), SBS and ABC TV (Australia).

He has won two Australian Film Institute (AFI) Awards for Best Documentary and numerous other national and international film and television awards. In 1997, Mabo - Life of an Island Man won the AFI Award, was nominated for a Logie and won both the prestigious NSW Premier's History Award and the NSW Premier's Award for Best Screenplay.

In 1997 he ventured into writing and directing new media. From 1997 to 2000 he co-wrote and directed the encyclopedic documentary Mabo - The Native Title Revolution CD-Rom, which was nominated for a British Academy Award (BAFTA) in 2001.

In 2002 he produced, co-directed, co-wrote and shot one of Australia's first online documentaries for ABC online, Homeless - Six Cities, Six Stories, Six Lives (www.abc.net.au/homeless), financed by the Australian Film Commission. Homeless was nominated for a Webby Award, an 'online Oscar' by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences.

Trevor Graham was the inaugural Head of Documentary at the Australian Film Television and Radio School in Sydney from 1997 to 2002. He has lectured and presented screenings on documentary throughout Asia, Canada, the USA and Australia.

Throughout 2002 and 2003, he directed and shot Lonely Boy Richard for Film Australia and ABC-TV. The project was nominated for an AFI Best Documentary Award in 2004. For ten months he lived and worked with the Yolngu, the Indigenous people of northeast Arnhem Land. Trevor has made many major documentary productions with indigenous people and communities and has a long-standing interest in Pacific Island history, culture and society. In 2004 he wrote and directed Hula Girls - Imaging Paradise, a co-production for SBS-TV and two European broadcasters, filmed in Hawaii, Tahiti, the USA and Europe.

Among his other documentary credits are: Red Matildas, Painting the Town (AFI Best Documentary Award 1987), Land Bilong Islanders, Dancing in the Moonlight, Paper Trail, Sugar Slaves, Aeroplane Dance, Mystique of the Pearl, Tosca - A Tale of Love and Torture, From Little Things Big Things Grow, Small Island Big Fight, The Pilot's Funeral, Keen As Mustard and Before Death Us Do Part.

DENISE HASLEM

Producer/Editor

Denise Haslem ASE is a producer and editor with over 25 years experience in the film and television industry. She produced and edited the award-winning Mabo Life of an Island Man, produced DocA Portrait of Herbert Vere Evatt and A Calcutta Christmas and co-produced Risky Business and Steel City.

In 2002 she spent eight months in Yirrkala, northeast Arnhem Land, producing and editing Lonely Boy Richard. In 2004 she produced and edited the second documentary shot during that time in Arnhem Land, The Pilot's Funeral. Ceremony - The Djungguwan of Northeast Arnhem Land is the third project, a DVD set that includes a new feature-length documentary Djungguwan Speaking to the Future and six mini-documentaries.

Her editing credits include many award-winning programs including Custody, My Life Without Steve, Canto a la Vida, The Night Belongs to the Novelist, Six Pack, Admission Impossible, Australia Daze, For All the World to See, The Opposite Sex, Aeroplane Dance, Mystique of the Pearl, Our Park, Hatred, Tosca - A Tale of Love and Torture, Minymaku Way and Hula Girls.

In 2002 she produced, directed and edited Film Australia's Outback DVD and in 2005 she produced and edited Lee Whitmore's animation The Safe House, also for Film Australia.

In 1998-99 she was the President of Australian Screen Editors (ASE), the guild devoted to protecting, promoting and improving the role of the editor, and in 2002 she was a recipient of an inaugural ASE accreditation.

WANYUBI MARIKA

Consultant

Dhuwa moiety

My father Milirrpum was, in my lifetime, the third elder or clan leader of the Rirratjingu mala, after Mawalan #1 and Mathaman. After the deaths of Mawalan, the original plaintiff in the country's first land rights case and of Mathaman it was my father who represented his people in Darwin's Supreme Court, Milirrpum v Nabalco. His spiritual birthplace was in Rarrkala, up near the Wessell Island group with the Bararrlu clan Millurr (birthplace). Milirrpum was a strong law man of his people, a wise man, a very good turtle hunter and fisherman who fed a lot of people in the old Mission days and a good father to immediate family and to the community. Milirrpum died in 1983, my mother the Rev Liyapadiny Marika (Gumana Gawirrin's sister) died in 1998.

I left Nhulunbuy High School in 1983 completing fourth year. I continued tertiary studies in 84 – 85 and worked in community areas of housing and roads. Part of 1985 was spent at my mothers homeland of Gangan as a training teacher at primary level. In 1988 I spent six months down south performing traditional dance around schools in different states with Ralph Nicholls, son of Sir Douglas who was an urban Yolngu who was using a lot of Arnhem Land boys and their talent in bringing them down and performing for many years. So I happen to be one of them. In 1989 I found work as a plant operator with YBE (Yolngu Business Enterprises), driving bulldozers, graders and trucks etc. In 1990 I moved into the environmental section to do rehab work, planting seed and growing trees at the mine site, cutting lawn in the town area for the big bosses in Nabalco, and driving the garbage truck around the mining town Nhulunbuy.

In 1991 I did some general accounting and clerical work at the YBE office which included paperwork re contracts given to YBE by Nabalco. I also took readings at the mining plant for caustic leaks and temperature. I have studied through TAFE and attained an Associate Diploma of Community Management. 1995 saw me elected as a community high-level leader as Yirrkala Dhanbul Community Association Council Chairman for the following three years. In 1998 I moved to the homeland side to establish a new homeland with my mother at Yinimala 17 km west of Baniyala and 200 km south of Yirrkala. Currently I am a councillor for Laynhapuy Homelands Council.

My fathers taught me how and what I can paint. It was for Buku-Larrnggay Mulkas Saltwater bark painting project that first had me painting publicly on a serious level. Living much of my time today at Byala (my wife's country whose father is Wakuthi). I paint amongst the Madarrpa clan artists as well as my own when living at Yirrkala. I am the Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Artist Committee Chairperson.

Exhibitions


1999–2001 Saltwater: Yirrkala Bark Paintings of Sea Country,
A national tour: Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra ACT; John Curtin Gallery, Curtin University, Perth, WA; National Maritime Museum, Darling Harbour, Sydney, NSW; Museum of Modern Art at Heide, Melbourne, Vic; Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs, NT; Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld
2000 State of My Country – A Survey of Contemporary Aboriginal Art,
Hogarth Galleries, Sydney NSW
2001 New From Old – Gawirrin, Yanggarriny, Dula, Wanyubi, Wukun,
Annandale Galleries, Annandale, Sydney, NSW
2002 Sydney Opera House Larrakitj installation
2003 Buwayak, Annandale Galleries, Sydney, NSW
2003 Wukidi installation, Supreme Court, Darwin, NT
2003 <abstractions>, Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra, ACT
2004 Wanyubi Marika first solo show, Annandale Galleries, Sydney, NSW
2005 Telstra NATSIAA
2005 Yakumirri Raft Artspace
(exhibition purchased by the Holmes ` Court Collection)

Collections Held

National Maritime Museum, Sydney, NSW
Artbank, Sydney, NSW
Sydney Opera House, Sydney, NSW
Kerry Stokes Collection
Supreme Court NT
Holmes á Court Collection
Kerry Packer Collection]

Bibliography

Saltwater: Yirrkala Bark Paintings of Sea Country, Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Centre in association with Jennifer Isaacs Publishing, Neutral Bay, NSW, 1999.

WUKUN DENNIS WANAMBI

Consultant

Dhuwa moiety

Wukun's father is Mithili who died before he was able to learn from him to any great degree. Wukun began painting as a result of the Saltwater project. His arm of the Marrakulu clan is responsible for saltwater imagery which had not been painted intensively since his father's death. His caretakers or djunggayi (principally Yanggarriny Wunungmurra [decd.] winner First Prize 1997 Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards NATSIAA) transferred their knowledge of these designs so that the title to saltwater could be asserted. (Some of these designs were outside even his father's repertoire.) His first bark for this project won the Best Bark at the 1998 NATSIAA.

He is an active community member in recreation and health projects and supports a large family.

After winning Best Bark Prize (1998) and being Highly Commended in 3D category (2003) in the Telstra Award he has been included in prestigious collections and had his first solo show in 2004. The success of that show led to him being invited to exhibit with Bill Nuttall's prestigious Niagara Gallery in Melbourne. Wukun has been involved heavily in all the major communal projects of the 2000s such as the Sydney Opera House commission, National Museum opening, Wukidi ceremony and the films Lonely Boy Richard, The Pilot's Funeral and Dhakiyarr vs the King.

Exhibitions


1998 15th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards (NATSIAA)
1998–2001 Saltwater: Yirrkala Bark Paintings of Sea Country,
A national tour: Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra ACT; John Curtin Gallery, Curtin University, Perth, WA; National Maritime Museum, Darling Harbour, Sydney, NSW; Museum of Modern Art at Heide, Melbourne, Vic; Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs, NT; Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld
2001 18th NATSIAA, Museum and Art Galleries of the NT, Darwin (MAGNT)
2001 New From Old – Gawirrin, Yanggarriny, Dula, Wanyubi, Wukun,
Annandale Galleries, Sydney, NSW
2002 19th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards,
Museum and Art Galleries of the NT, Darwin
2003 Brighton International Art Festival, UK
2003 Larrakitj, Rebecca Hossack Gallery, UK
2003 20th NATSIAA MAGNT
2004 Wukun Wanambi (first solo show), Raft 2 Darwin
2005 Wukun Wanambi, Niagara Galleries, Melbourne
2005 Yakumirri Raft Artspace
(exhibition purchased by the Holmes á Court Collection)
2005 22nd NATSIAA MAGNT

Collections Held

Museum and Art Galleries of the NT, Darwin
Australian National Maritime Museum
Sydney Opera House, NSW
Harland Collection
Kerry Stokes Collection
NT Supreme Court
South Australian Art Gallery
National Gallery of Australia
Art Gallery of NSW
Holmes á Court Collection
Artbank

Awards

Best Bark, NATSIAA 1998
Highly Commended (3D Work), NATSIAA 2003

Bibliography

Saltwater: Yirrkala Bark Paintings of Sea Country, Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Centre in association with Jennifer Isaacs Publishing, Neutral Bay, NSW, 1999.

Artbank brochure, Australian Government Department of Communications, IT and the Arts, 2005.

PHILIPPA DEVESON

Writer/Consultant

Philippa Deveson is currently working as a media project officer with the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research at the Australian National University. She has recently finished a multi-media biography on CD-ROM of the renowned Yolngu artist, Narritjin Maymuru.

From 1981 to 1984, she worked with Ian Dunlop on The Yirrkala Film Project, focusing on the Yolngu Aboriginal community of northeast Arnhem Land. From 1994 to 1996, she was editor/writer for an extension of the project, funded by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies and Film Australia. She and Ian Dunlop shared the Royal Anthropological Institute Film Prize in 1996 for the film Conversations with Dundiwuy Wanambi. She received an AIATSIS Research Grant in 1997 to produce background notes and documentation for the Yirrkala films.

In 1998, she was appointed as a project coordinator, preparing exhibition proposals for the National Museum of Australia and in 1999 Philippa and Howard Morphy co-curated Yingapungapu, one of the opening exhibitions at the National Museum of Australia.


IAN DUNLOP

Writer/Director/Consultant

Ian was born in London, United Kingdom, in 1927 and settled in Australia in 1948.

He joined the Australian Commonwealth Film Unit (now Film Australia) in 1956, working on general documentaries in Australia and Papua New Guinea until 1965. Since 1965 he has specialised in ethnographic filmmaking. Ian left the staff of Film Australia in 1987 but continued to work there in a freelance capacity completing unfinished projects. He is now working with other filmmakers on new projects associated with his work.

In 1965 Ian proposed and undertook an ethnographic film project on the daily life and technology of an Aboriginal family still living a traditional hunter-gatherer life in the Western Desert (Gibson Desert) of Australia. From this and a similar project in 1967 he made a series of 19 films under the general title People of the Australian Western Desert and the more general film Desert People.

In 1967 he compiled and presented a 'Retrospective Review of Australian Ethnographic Film 1901–1967' at the Festival dei Popoli, Florence. This was followed by a tour of Europe with the retrospective and in 1968 of North America.

In 1969 he collaborated with French anthropologist Dr Maurice Godelier to film the complex initiation ceremonies of the Baruya of the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea from which was made a seven-and-a-half hour record, divided into nine films, under the title Towards Baruya Manhood.

In 1979 Ian was invited by the Baruya to return, with Maurice Godelier, to film further ceremonies. In 1992 he completed a 13-and-a-half-hour record film Baruya Muka Archival, together with several volumes of accompanying documentation and translation.

In 1970 Ian began a long-term film project with the Yolngu of Yirrkala in northeast Arnhem Land, at the top end of Australia's Northern Territory. Filming continued until 1982 and editing finished in 1996. Twenty-two films have been produced under the general title, The Yirrkala Film Project. These films deal with traditional Aboriginal communities in change, their strong spiritual life and their relationship to the land.

Retrospectives of Ian's work have been held in Tokyo (1982), the Festival dei Popoli, Florence (1983) and the Beeld voor Beeld Festival of Visual Anthropology, Amsterdam (2001). He has given many guest screenings of films in Australia, Europe, USA and Asia and his films have received many awards. Personal awards include the Australian Film Institute's Raymond Longford Award (1968); Festival dei Popoli's Giampaolo Paoli Award (1983) and the Medal of the Order of Australia (1986). He was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute (UK) in 1991.

Professor HOWARD MORPHY

Consultant/Writer

Professor Howard Morphy BSc, MPhil London, PhD ANU, FASSA FAHA is Director of the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research at the Australian National University. He was previously Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at the Australian National University and before that Professor of Anthropology at University College London. He was a convener of the 1996–97 Linacre Lectures on the Environment. He has conducted fieldwork in Arnhem Land, Northern Australia, and in the Roper Valley. He is at present researching the life and art of Narritjin Maymuru.

He has collaborated on many films of Arnhem Land ceremonial performance with Ian Dunlop of Film Australia. He has published widely in the anthropology of art, aesthetics, performance, museum anthropology, visual anthropology and religion. As Curator of Anthropology at the Pitt Rivers Museum Oxford he organised a number of exhibitions including: Australia in Oxford, Basketmakers: Form and Meaning in Native American Basketry and In Place Out of Time (with David Elliot) (MOMA, Oxford). He was the curator, with Philippa Deveson, of the exhibition Yingapungapu for the opening of the Museum of Australia in Canberra. He was editorial advisor for the Aboriginal section of The Dictionary of Art.

He was the Malinowski lecturer in 1993, Beatrice Blackwood lecturer in 1996, the inaugural Forge lecturer, 1998 and gave the 1999 Fagg lecture at the British Museum. He was awarded the JG Crawford medal of the Australian National University, the JB Donne prize for the anthropology of art (1988), and has twice been awarded the Stanner Prize of the Australian Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (1985, 1992). His books include Ancestral Connections: Art and an Aboriginal System of Knowledge (1991), University of Chicago Press; Rethinking Visual Anthropology (with Marcus Banks, 1997), Yale University Press; and Aboriginal Art (1998), Phaidon. His most recent publication is a CD-ROM The Art of Narritjin Maymuru, ANU E-Press (with Philippa Deveson and Katie Hayne).

Selected Publications

Journey to the Crocodile's Nest: An Accompanying Monograph to the Film Madarrpa Funeral at Gurka'wuy, Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies, Canberra, 1984.

'The Anthropology of Art' in Tim Ingold (ed), Companion Encyclopaedia of Anthropology: Humanity, Culture and Social Life, Routledge, London, 1994, pp 648685.

'The Interpretation of Ritual: Reflections From Film on Anthropological Method' in
Man, Vol 29 No 1, 1994, pp 117146 [text of Malinowski Memorial Lecture].

'Landscape and the Reproduction of Yolngu Society' in E Hirsch & M O'Hanlon ( eds ),
The Anthropology of LandscapeBetween Place and Space, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1995, pp 184209.

'Aboriginal Art in a Global Context' in D Miller (ed), Worlds ApartModernity Through
the Prism of the Local
, ASA Decennial Conference Series, Routledge, London, 1995,
pp 211239.

'Aesthetics as a Cross Cultural Category' in Tim Ingold (ed), Key Debates in Anthropology 198893, Routledge, London, 1996, pp 25560 and parts of 276291.

Edited with Marcus Banks, Rethinking Visual Anthropology, Yale University Press,
New Haven, 1997.

Aboriginal Art, Phaidon Press, London, 1998.

Edited with Margo Smith Boles, Art from the Land, University of Virginia Museum of Modern Art, Charlottesville, 1999.

Edited with Kate Flint, Culture, Landscape and the Environment, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000.

Edited with Max Charlesworth & Françoise Dussart, Aboriginal Religions in Australia
An Anthology of Recent Readings
, Ashgate, Aldershot, 2005.

Edited with Morgan Perkins, Anthropology of Art: A Reader, Blackwell Publishing, Malden, 2005.

'Seeing Indigenous Australian Art' in Mariet Westerman (ed), Anthropologies of Art,
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, 2005.


Professor NICOLAS PETERSON

Interviewee

Professor Nicolas Peterson is Head of School and Professor in Anthropology at the Australian National University. He is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia and was awarded the Lucy Mair Medal for Applied Anthropology from the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland in 1999.

Major research projects include Anthropological and Aboriginal; perspectives on the Donald Thomson Collection material culture, collecting and identity (ARC Linkage grant 2003-2006), in conjunction with Museum Victoria, Dr Louise Hamby, post doctoral fellow from the School of Archaeology and Anthropology at the Australian National University, and Ms Lindy Allen, Senior Curator, from Museum Victoria and the Warlpiri songlines: anthropological, linguistic and Indigenous perspectives (ARC Linkage grant 2005-2007), in conjunction with the Warlpiri Janganpa Association, and the Central Land Council, the School of English at the University of Queensland and the Schools of Music and Archaeology and Anthropology at the Australian National University.

Together with director Roger Sandall, Nicolas Peterson filmed The Djunguan of Yirrkala in 1966. He was interviewed by Trevor Graham for Ceremony – The Djungguwan of Northeast Arnhem Land in Sydney in November 2004. A transcript of this interview can be found in the Background Notes on this website.

WEBSITE CREDITS

All material sourced from CEREMONY DVD

A Film Australia Digital Learning production in association with Roar Film.

Roar Film

Producers: Steve Thomas, Kath Symmons
Creative Director: Raef Sawford
Designer: Chris Rees
Programmers: Nathan Burns, Andrew Scriber

Film Australia

Executive Producer: Anna Grieve
Project Manager: Aida Innocente
National Sales Manager: Jacqui Stone
Consultants: Denise Haslem and Trevor Graham
Consultants: Ian Dunlop
Philippa Deveson and Howard Morphy from the Centre for Cross-Cultural Research, The Australian National University


WITH THANKS TO

Yirrkala Dhanbul Community Association

The Rirratjingu Association

Dr Patrick Dodson, Caroline Carmody & Paddy Naughton
The Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS)

Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Art Centre & Museum